What Are Exosomes?

Diagnosing Diseases Like Cancer Via Exosomes

Autoimmune disease. Bacterial and viral infections. Stroke. Parkinson’s. Alzheimer’s. Cancer.

What do they all have in common? Potentially, a cure. All thanks to the tiny bubbles on the outer rim of our cells that carry biochemical messages: our exosomes. They’ve become critical tools in the prognosis, diagnosis, and treatment of a wide range of diseases and dysfunctions.

Exosomes are small fluid-filled balloons along the endocytic pathway, along which all biochemicals must travel to reach our cells. These lipid vesicles shuttle proteins and genetic information between cells to stimulate repair and to regulate gene expression.

Now biologists have discovered that exosomes can also carry molecules that disrupt disease.

These messenger balloons make the perfect drug delivery vehicle, and, exosomes themselves, when derived from stem cells, can perform their own regenerative medicine.

Because all human bodily fluids – blood, urine, saliva, semen, vaginal fluids, breast milk, and amniotic fluid – contain exosomes, they can send communications just about anywhere in your body.

Researchers across the globe are developing exosome therapies and exosome-derived drugs at lightning speed, and American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine expert Stephanie Wolff is following their every move.

This passionate longevity advocate and her team of dedicated specialists at The Novus Center recognize that disease can steal your days away, and that you don’t want to wait to try cutting edge solutions. That’s why they offer customized exosome therapy.

Thousands of researchers have spent decades trying to answer millions of patients’ most pressing questions: How can I manage Parkinson’s? Prevent Alzheimer’s? How is cancer treated? Novus biohackers work tirelessly to share all those answers as they become available.

For a custom assessment of your unique condition call The Novus Center (310) 954-1450 or contact us here today.

How can exosomes treat disease?

As you read this, millions of tiny bubbles, released from cells carrying important molecular mail, are racing through your bloodstream. Exosomes transfer proteins, RNA, and DNA between cells, delivering commands to begin repair and to regulate genes. Because they contain properties of sender cells they affect receiver cells upon arrival. That’s why the use of stem cells is changing every day. There are therapies that no longer need to inject the stem cell itself.

A cancer cell, for example, produces a larger-than-average amount of exosomes. Cancer exosomes encourage tumor formation and new blood vessel growth, which enable cancer to spread. But those same delivery vehicles can also be forced to make a U-turn, reverse their flow, and deliver the substances required to stop the spread of cancer.

Exosomes can also be used as a diagnostic and preventative tool. Oncologists can now detect cancer by analyzing the exosomes in your bodily fluids. Exosomes produced in Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been shown to help reduce inflammation, the root cause of so many autoimmune dysfunctions, as well as improve stroke symptoms.

Exosomes are efficient messengers because:

  • they're only 30 – 100 nm in diameter – small enough to cross barriers that cells can't
  • one exosome can carry multiple drug or biochemical doses
  • they're naturally occurring in your body and cannot be rejected
  • have been shown to be more efficient than whole cells in treating stroke

Exosomes have always enhanced the therapeutic effects of stem cell therapy. But biologists have also been isolating and delivering these beneficial signalers directly, rather than within stem cells.

As with any medical treatment, results of exosome therapy will vary from patient to patient depending on age, environmental conditions, genetics, and aftercare.

Reserve your appointment

Dump your bottles of side effect-laden pharmaceuticals. Stress no more about the costs and risks of surgery. By analyzing your cells’ pathways, our team of specialists can customize your exosome therapy. To work with a dedicated longevity advocate, call Stephanie Wolf and her Novus Center team of specialists at (310) 954-1450 or contact us here.

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